All news

ARC logo
03
Nov
2011
The Research School of Biology achieved a 52% success rate in the recently-announced ARC Discovery Grant round, as well as significant success in the ARC Linkage and LIEF Grant schemes. The following people were the recipients of grants to commence in 2012.
ARC logo
03
Nov
2011
Two members of the Research School of Biology's Division of Biomedical Science and Biochemistry have been awarded NHMRC Project grants to commence in 2012. Professor Ted Maddess: "Novel functional testing for early diabetic retinopathy"
Robert Heinsohn with Eclectus parrot chicks (red female and green male)
24
Oct
2011
The mysterious behaviour of female Eclectus parrots killing their sons immediately after they hatch has been unravelled by a team of researchers from The Australian National University.
Microdot on a wasp
13
Oct
2011
New research by scientists at The Australian National University will see wasps being tracked in the same way as stolen cars – using specialist microdot technology.
Cophixalus kulakula. Photo by Kieran Aland
07
Oct
2011
ANU Media Release: New boulder frog discovered Friday 07 October 2011 Scientists have discovered two new species of boulder-dwelling frogs, hidden in remote areas of rainforest in north-east Queensland.
UNA-RSB
23
Aug
2011
The following six people have recently been appointed to Academic positions in the Research School of Biology, and will join us in the New Year:
Trees in a Eucalyptus forest
27
Jul
2011
Professor Bill Foley discusses the mapping of Eucalyptus grandis with Phillip Adams from the ABC's Radio National.  Related links
Renee Catullo and frog
26
Jul
2011
A new miniature frog species or ‘toadlet’ has been discovered in the resource-rich Pilbara region of Western Australia, an area previously thought to support very few of the amphibians.
A worker bee and queen
21
Jul
2011
New research published today in Nature Communications online journal suggests that monogamy and close genetic relationships work together to enhance the cooperative social structure of insects such as bees, wasps and ants.
Gonzalo and students in a growth room. Photo by Tim Wetherell
14
Jul
2011
This annual award recognises excellence, innovation and contributions to teaching plant science at an undergraduate level, at an Australian intuition.
Arabidopsis with seed pods
06
Jul
2011
A second-year biology course is getting students to swap the microscope for the magnifying glass to crack the case of mysterious mutant plants.
Peter Solomon. Photo: Belinda Pratten
01
Jul
2011
Dr Peter Solomon is tackling two critical issues – how to ensure that we protect crops from disease and how to make sure the wine in your glass tastes better. Article from the ANU Reporter Winter 2011, by Tegan Dolstra.
ALTC 2011 award, with Adrienne Nicotra, Gonzalo Estavillo, Beth Beckmann, Kiaran Kirk, Ulrike Mathesius, Aidan Byrne, Christopher Fulton
01
Jul
2011
Two ANU staff and one teaching team from the College of Medicine, Biology and the Environment have been recognised in the 2011 Australian Teaching and Learning Council (ALTC) Citations for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning.
The larger bronze-cuckoo has tricked the smaller bird into believing it is its chick. Photo by Daniel Koh
01
Jul
2011
Australian cuckoos are taking new evolutionary steps to ensure maximum chance of survival. By Lucy Wedlock
Steaks grilling
16
Jun
2011
Adjusting the intake of high protein foods like meat, eggs and milk products could determine whether you become a rugby player or marathon runner and may help you lose weight, according to new research published this month in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
Wrens mobbing a cuckoo.  Photo: William Feeney
13
Jun
2011
Australian superb fairy-wrens learn how to recognise threats to their species through social learning. Research from the ANU has found the first direct evidence that naïve hosts learn from their acquaintances to identify enemies such as brood parasites.
Worker bee on lavender
19
May
2011
Bees remember landmarks and read information from the sky to find their way home from an amazing 11 kilometres away and over several days’ travel, a new study from The Australian National University shows.
Purple-crowned fairy-wren. Image credit: Michelle Hall/Australian Wildlife Conservancy
02
May
2011
The baffling question of why some animals help raise offspring which aren't their own is closer to being answered, thanks to new research from The Australian National University.
IR vision therapy on a rat
27
Apr
2011
Prospects for recovery of lost vision have brightened with the release of new scientific findings showing that the use of gentle near infra-red light can reverse damage caused by exposure to bright light, up to a month after treatment.
Female fiddler crabs
15
Apr
2011
A study from The Australian National University has revealed for the first time how an animal sees and responds to predatory attacks in its natural environment.

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