Jennions Group - Behavioural and reproductive ecology

Gambusia (Mosquito fish). Photo: Andrew Kahn

We are a happy and extremely productive research group. We place a strong emphasis on creating a friendly working environment. If you thrive best in a winner takes all setting then we are not for you. If, however, you enjoy biology, like working with animals and find evolution fascinating then read on. We value and strive for research excellence. Ultimately scientists are evaluated on what they publish - avoid the hype and just check out our publications. If you are considering a PhD or Post-doc and want to produce high quality work with a view to pursuing a career in biology then please get in touch.

What do we do? We are interested in whole organism evolutionary biology, especially the evolution of behavioural and morphological reproductive traits. Our main focus is therefore testing sexual selection theory. The kinds of questions we ask are:

  • Why is there a tight scaling relationship between body and genital size in some species?
  • Is there a trade-off between diets that maximize mating as opposed to fertilization success?
  • How does inbreeding affect sexually selected traits versus other traits?
  • Why do females mate multiply?
  • What affects the offspring sex ratio?

We conduct: behavioural ecology experiments, breeding Designs (quantitative genetics), artificial selection, and meta-analysis of literature.

We use: acoustic monitoring devices, sound analysis, immunological assays, diet manipulations, paternity analysis, and sperm assays.

We have conducted research on: fish, crickets, beetles, fiddler crabs, and humans.

Members

Leader

Michael Jennions

Michael Jennions
I grew up in South Africa. My MSc was on sperm competition in frogs. One highlight was designing a frog condom (yes, a plastic...

Divisional Visitor

Honours Student

Masters Student

PhD Student

Postdoctoral Fellow

Research Assistant

Special Project Student

Projects

Open to students

Publications

Publications

News & events

News

19
May
2016
Big isn’t always better when it comes to the size of male genitals.
01
Feb
2016
Queen bees and ants emit a chemical that alters the DNA of their daughters and keeps them as sterile and industrious workers, scientists have found.
ARC logo
02
Nov
2015
The School has done very well with regards to Discovery projects and DECRA fellowships.  Congratulations to all successful applicants.
abstract image of journal article with male and female symbols
09
May
2015
A peer reviewer suggested that two female researchers find “one or two male biologists” to co-author a manuscript they had written and submitted to PLoS ONE.

Pages

Highlights

Jennie Mallela

Research Background

Megan Head

Group research focus
Michael Jennions and students

Michael Jennions

Bizarre evolutionary games arise when species evolve to have males and females.

Updated:  22 September 2018/Responsible Officer:  Director RSB/Page Contact:  Webmaster RSB