Jennions Group - Behavioural and reproductive ecology

Gambusia (Mosquito fish). Photo: Andrew Kahn

We are a happy and extremely productive research group. We place a strong emphasis on creating a friendly working environment. If you thrive best in a winner takes all setting then we are not for you. If, however, you enjoy biology, like working with animals and find evolution fascinating then read on. We value and strive for research excellence. Ultimately scientists are evaluated on what they publish - avoid the hype and just check out our publications. If you are considering Honours, a PhD or Post-doc and want to produce high quality work with a view to pursuing a career in biology then please get in touch.

What do we do? We are interested in whole organism evolutionary biology, especially the evolution of behavioural and morphological reproductive traits. Our main focus is testing sexual selection theory. The kinds of questions we ask are:

  • Is there a trade-off between diets that maximize mating as opposed to fertilization success?
  • How does inbreeding affect sexually selected traits versus other traits?
  • Why do females mate multiply?
  • What affects the offspring sex ratio?
  • Are males more variable than females in their behaviour?
  • Does winning a fight increase your future likelihood of winning another fight?
  • Are older more succesful because they are more sexually experienced?
  • What determines the rate of sperm production? 

We conduct: behavioural ecology experiments, artificial selection studies, and meta-analysis of literature.

We use: immunological assays, diet manipulations, paternity analysis, and sperm assays.

We have conducted research on: fish, crickets, beetles, fiddler crabs, and humans.

Members

Leader

Michael Jennions

Michael Jennions
I grew up in South Africa. My MSc was on sperm competition in frogs, which involved designing a frog condom (yes, a plastic bag...

Divisional Visitor

Masters Student

PhD Student

Postdoctoral Fellow

Projects

Open to students

Publications

Publications

News & events

News

Damsel fish
18
Sep
2013
The comparative athleticism of fish probably isn’t a thought that crosses many people’s minds.
A parasite attached to a bream. Illustration: Erin Walsh
04
Jun
2013
Fish with parasites attached to their heads have a stronger preference for left or right when facing a T-intersection, giving them an edge when it comes to escaping predators, research from The Aus
Michael Jennions and models of men
09
Apr
2013
Penis size influences a man’s sex appeal, and the taller the man, the bigger the effect, research from ANU has revealed.
Andrew Kahn. Photo by Tegan Dolstra
11
Jan
2012
A good upbringing can make you more attractive to females – if you are a mosquitofish, that is.

Pages

Highlights

Jennie Mallela

Research Background

Megan Head

Group research focus
Michael Jennions and students

Michael Jennions

Bizarre evolutionary games arise when species evolve to have males and females.

Updated:  21 November 2019/Responsible Officer:  Director RSB/Page Contact:  Webmaster RSB